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Adafruit I2C Barometric Pressure/Temperature Sensor

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About this product

Overview

  • I2C-controlled
  • Works with both Raspberry Pi and Arduino
  • Great basic barometric pressure sensor at 1.5hPa / 50m altitude resolution

Product overview

• I2C-controlled• Works with both Raspberry Pi and Arduino
• Great basic barometric pressure sensor at 1.5hPa / 50m altitude resolution
• 500-1150 hPa (up to 10km altitude)
• Fully tested and assembled breakout board
• All headers included (to solder yourself)

This pressure sensor from Freescale is a great low-cost sensing solution for measuring barometric pressure. At 1.5 hPa resolution it's great for basic barometric pressure sensing. The sensor is soldered onto a PCB with 10K pull-up resistors on the I2C pins.

This chip is good for use with power and logic voltages ranging from 2.4V to 5.5V so you can use it with your 3V or 5V microcontroller. There's a basic temperature sensor inside but there's no specifications in the datasheet so we're not sure how accurate it is.

Using the sensor is easy. For example, if you're using an Arduino, simply connect the VDD pin to the 5V voltage pin, GND to ground, SCL to I2C Clock (Analog 5 on an UNO) and SDA to I2C Data (Analog 4 on an UNO). Then download Adafruit's MPL115A2 Arduino library and example code for temperature, pressure and basic altitude calculation. Install the library, and load the example sketch. Immediately you'll have the temperature, pressure and altitude data printed in the serial console.

The MPL3115A2 has a typical 1.5 Pascal resolution, which can resolve altitude at 0.3 meters (compare to the BMP180 which can do 0.17m). It has some upsides compared to the BMP180, such as interrupt outputs for ultra-low power usage, and its also a heck of a lot easier to read altitude with a built in altimeter calculation - no calibration reading and calculating required. As a bonus, there's even a fairly good temperature sensor with ±1°C typical accuracy (±3°C max).

This chip likes to be used with 2-3.6V power and logic voltages, so we placed it on a breakout with a 3V regulator and logic level shifting. Its easy to use with any Arduino or microcontroller that has i2c capability.

This chip looks and sounds a whole lot like the MPL115A2 but this is the precision version, which can act as an altitude-sensor as well as barometer

Using the sensor is easy. For example, if you're using an Arduino, simply connect the VDD pin to the 5V voltage pin, GND to ground, SCL to I2C Clock (Analog 5 on an UNO) and SDA to I2C Data (Analog 4 on an UNO). Then download Adafruit's MPL3115A2 Arduino library and example code for temperature, pressure and basic altitude calculation. Install the library, and load the example sketch. Immediately you'll have the temperature, pressure and altitude data printed in the serial console.

Rated 1 out of 5 by from Not Straightforward I could not get the Adafruit library and sketch to compile. I am not entirely new to Arduino but I could not figure out the file types and I could not find enough info for me to do anything with this. Someone with more knowledge than me might do better with it.
Date published: 2016-11-24
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