Power from Space Clock Kit

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Quoting product code: N11JG

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About this product

Overview

Product overview

• Captures electrical energy from space to power an LCD clock!
• Circuit simply and safely rectifies a tiny fraction of the mega-watts of RF energy from radio/TV transmissions
• Requires at least 21 metres of wire for the antenna and ground wires (not included)

This unlikely circuit enables the capture of small amounts for electrical energy from space and, typically, can power a small LED or an LCD clock wired for the purpose. The circuit simply rectifies a tiny fraction of the mega-watts of radio frequency energy broadcast in the UK from radio and TV transmissions. When connected to a long wire antenna and to an earth point, the circuit will output micro-watts of power – sufficient to energise very low-current consumption components and products.

The kit comes complete with all the components that need soldering to a small printed circuit board together with two antenna insulating links. An additional requirement is a length of wire for the antenna of at least 10 metres. The antenna has to be stretched horizontally between two insulated points as high up as possible. Some geographical areas might suffer from overall low signal strength and a much longer antenna might be needed to compensate.

Please note: the LCD clock is not included but may be ordered separately wire antenna and to an earth point, the circuit will output micro-watts of power – sufficient to energise very low-current consumption components and products.

Is the description mistaken in saying it requires 21 METRES of wire?!  That's longer than a tennis court, and makes this slightly in-practical...

Asked by: Neil
The description is correct.
Answered by: Dominic
Date published: 2016-02-03
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